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Posts Tagged ‘cancer resource’

Cancer Fighting Strategies

On this blog our focus is on the friends and family of those who have cancer – their problems and concerns, how they are affected, and how they can help both themselves and their loved ones. Often for friends and family their top concern is how will the person with cancer heal? Whilst healing cancer is not your job, it is understandable that you would want to be aware of the best cancer resources.

Information on the internet can be bewildering, so here is our selection of some resources which may help with support for the person fighting cancer. (more…)

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It was recently reported that morphine may encourage the spread of cancer – and yet this a drug which can be given to those who have the disease. See BBC News Article As a person who is not medically qualified, I do not have sufficient knowledge to determine how relevant this information is to people who have cancer in general, or any specific person’s cancer. And yet this kind of information is now available to me and every person searching desperately for anything to help themselves or a family member survive cancer and thrive in the future.
But what is the quality of the information? How can you judge? This is a study of whether morphine causes cancer to progress, and the results indicate that it could indeed do so. And yet those commenting on the results say both that further testing will be needed before clinical decisions change, and that there is a drug which could be given in addition to suppress the action. Once upon a time, not very long ago, this kind of information would be available to a few people who were qualified to understand the research and what it meant – and of course they would probably have their own differing opinions and viewpoints. Now such information is all too easy to get through the internet, though unless we have experience of medical language we will probably have to trust others to interpret it for us.
As a family member or supporter, what are you to do with this information if you come across it? Should you speak to the person who has cancer, counselling them to avoid morphine at all costs? (If I was working on getting better from cancer, I think I might find such advice a little wearing after a while, however well-intentioned.) Should you contact their doctors demanding to know whether the person has been given morphine and if so what will change now? Or possibly just throw up your hands and despair of ever understanding all the complicated information?
I think that the right approach is to make the most of the information available by following some research guidelines:

  1. As a friend or family member, only do research if the person who has cancer wants you to do so. Offer, but never insist or send information without permission.
  2. Preferably only one person should do (or at least co-ordinate) the research, and then feed back their findings to the person who has cancer. The person who has cancer can then decide what to ask the medical staff. If this is not possible, the person who has done the research should attend hospital appointments in order to ask any necessary questions. For instance it would be acceptable to ask if there are any alternatives if morphine is suggested.
  3. Question the source of information carefully. Is it unbiased? Who paid for studies, for instance? Was the research well designed (if you cannot tell, see what is being said about it by other parties)?
  4. Limit questions to the medical staff as much as possible to those which are relevant to the person’s current situation and treatment.
  5. Limit time spent researching and/or rely on a small number of trusted sources (the good ones will report on everything significant). Those trusted sources could include ones which are specific to the type and stage of cancer your friend or family member has.
  6. Remember that you can’t be expected to understand everything. As you do more research your level of understanding will probably grow.
  7. Look for positive stories as well as negative or worrisome information. It’s always good to have some hope.

You can find a short list of trusted cancer information websites by visiting Families Facing Cancer.

Please share your stories and feedback below. Has the internet provided information which helped (or didn’t help) your family? Does researching on the internet depress you, or help you feel more in control? Share these or any other thoughts by typing into the comment box. I’m looking forward to hearing from you.

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